All posts tagged: Expert Educator Columns

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Bozena Kraj: Classical Music Makes Us Fly High in Project Based Learning

by Bozena Kraj Expert Educator Columnist, Poland Project Based Learning, which is learning through experience, should be full of activities which let us our students gain knowledge in an exciting and practical way. Those challenging tasks could be one, two or three dimensional. And the truth is that as long as my students use music as the part of our projects, their work should be regarded as three dimensional. It means that these activities influence my students in an effective way, developing their talents, imagination and sensitivity, opening them to what “cannot be expressed into words and which cannot remain silent,” as Victor Hugo once wrote. No matter if it is a mixture of maths and music; history and music; English and music, singing, composing, playing the instruments, even as a background activity – all of them make sense, creating something special in our tasks: elusive and sophisticated atmosphere which develops imagination and raises our project expectations to higher levels of artistic expression. Our experience with classical music began with a project connected with Frederic …

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Ernani Fernandez: DepEd Computerization Program (DCP) Orientation and Training of ICT Teachers

By Ernani S. Fernandez Expert Educator Columnist, Philippines The Department of Education (DepEd) Division of Leyte through the Schools Division Superintendent, Dr. Ronelo Al K. Firmo and the Division ICT Coordinator Mr. Ismael T. Posion spearheaded the ICT training to teachers in relation to the Kto12 Curriculum and the 21st century education last November 2014. This training was also part of the commitment of Mr. Ernani S. Fernandez to the Microsoft Innovative Expert Educator Program, to train teachers on the use of technology in education and let the students acquire the 21st century skills. DepEd Computerization Program (DCP) is the program of the Department of Education that aims to provide public schools with appropriate technologies that would enhance the teaching-learning process and meet the challenges of the 21st century. This program shall respond to the computer backlog of public schools by providing them hardware and software, and training on simple trouble shooting (DO No. 78, s. 2010).

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Andrew Howard: Changing Student Engagement in Technology

by Andrew Howard Expert Educator Columnist, UK When preparing my talk for the Microsoft Education Leaders’ Briefing at BETT, London, I was reflecting further on the issue of student engagement. As I said in my last blog, students are, in fact, resistant to adopting technological solutions and educational experiences. Yes, they will do something with glee if it is presented via technology, but only in fact because it is a gimmick and something different. When you try to instil long term change and technology adoption in a student body, you quickly come against resistance. We call our young people digital natives and ourselves the immigrants; we have done so for so long that it has become the accepted norm. And I don’t disagree with this (although there are young educators coming into schools now who also qualify as digital natives … ). What I disagree with is that this is then the end of the discussion. They are the natives, so we don’t need to guide them or teach them how to use it. Also, …

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Andrew Howard: The Problem of Being a 21st Century Principal

by Andrew Howard Expert Educator Columnist, UK When I started teaching, a quarter of a century ago, the school I started teaching in had the most modern technology out – one black & white photocopier (only used by the Senior Management) & a couple old fashioned ‘Banda’ machines (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spirit_duplicator) were the height of technology… the young people had all the problems of being young, without the overlay of technology – the biggest ‘complaint’ was that the house phone cord would not stretch enough for young people to have a private conversation with friends! To get a feel for my journey into teaching, please see my interview on Anthony Salcito’s blog, Daily Edventures; I am as passionate today (if not more so) about changing young people’s lives as I was 25 years ago!

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Bridget Crooks: Redefining My Classroom in 2015

by Bridget Crooks Expert Educator Columnist, New Zealand Redefining – to change the meaning of something or to make people think about something in a new or different way. I am sure most of us have heard of the SAMR model for the integration of technology into our classrooms. Developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura, this model (see image above) shows a progression (or ladder) that teachers often follow as they use technology in their classrooms. What I like best about SAMR is that it supports teachers to design, develop and create innovative learning opportunities in the classroom. It aims to transform learning experiences – which ultimately result in better achievement for our students. Image the creation of Dr. Ruben Puentedura, Ph.D. http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/ What excites me the most is redefinition. But remember – it doesn’t mean that you are doing it wrong if you don’t reach redefinition, some tasks just aren’t made for it and great learning can happen without redefining what you do in the classroom.

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Andy Li: My e-School Bag– OneNote

by Andy Li Expert Educator Columnist, Hong Kong Tablet PCs have become affordable nowadays. This drives e-Learning into a BYOD era. Students are able to obtain large amount of information and absorb knowledge through the Internet with their own personal learning devices. However, a simple, multi-platform and convenient tool is needed to use with their devices for learning so that students can save, consolidate, and share their learning resources with other students and teachers. OneNote can fulfill everything we need. In Windows 8, OneNote as a Windows app has already been installed as default. Students just need to log onto Windows 8 with their Microsoft account to activate the OneNote app. OneNote can also be used on iOS and Android and students can view their notes anytime and anywhere through their smartphones or other tablets. What is OneNote?

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Kelli Etheredge: Looking for a New Year’s Resolution? Resolve to Use OneNote with Your Students!

by Kelli Etheredge Expert Educator Columnist, USA Happy New Year! As it is every year, resolutions are a hot topic.  Twitter, Facebook, commercials – everywhere I look someone is resolving to change a habit.  While some center around personal goals (improving your health, de-cluttering), others are focused on work goals (learning a new skill, organizing).  I’ll admit it – I don’t think I have ever stuck to a New Year’s resolution.  Sad, I know.  Don’t get me wrong – I have changed a habit or two in my lifetime.  They just haven’t happened as a result of a New Year’s commitment.  Instead, they have spawned from some in-the-moment experience (be it January or June) that has prompted me to change. All of the resolution chatter within the last week started me thinking about habits I have changed over the years and how they happened.  Some were resolutions I made, some were prompted by others pushing me to change, and some were happenstance.  To my surprise, upon reflecting, some of the best changes have actually occurred …

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Kemi Olurinola: How Would You Define “Limited Technology”?

By Kemi Olurinola Expert Educator Columnist, Nigeria Recently I read an article on Mind/Shift titled Think Big: How to Jumpstart Tech Use In Low-Income Schools. The title did get my attention and so I decide to read the article, I am always interested in adding to my bank of ideas aimed at helping low income schools. The article was about Daisy Dyer Duerr, Prek-12 Principal of St. Paul Public Schools in St. Paul, Arkansas. While it did make an interesting read and I would readily recommend it, my focus of interest was at the point where the technologies available at her school were listed. When Duerr started at St. Paul Schools three years ago, the technology available to teachers was limited to a: few smart boards, two computer labs with shared PC desktops and a laptop cart with 10 Mac Books still in their boxes. What is amazing about this is that, this is meant to be a public school with “limited technology”. Where I come from or live and work a school that boast …

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Tammy Dunbar: Let’s Resolve to Get Messy!

by Tammy Dunbar Expert Educator Columnist, USA Too often our New Year’s Resolutions involve perfection: we want to look better, weigh less, and have whiter teeth (but not whiter hair). We want our students to score higher on those standardized tests, our lesson plans to work efficiently and effectively the first time, and our technology to work exactly the way it’s supposed to every time. This New Year, let’s instead resolve to be more like my animated hero, Ms. Frizzle. Let’s take chances. Let’s make mistakes. Let’s get messy. If we want our students to become problem-solvers, we need to let them practice it without worrying about grades or assessments. We need to be comfortable with them discussing ideas and trying them out. We need to embrace this attitude, both in ourselves and in our students. Our students are terrified of being wrong; we need to guide them toward the idea that failure is valuable. Henry Ford once pointed out, “The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing.”

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Scott Bricker: The Coach’s Corner- Communication in the 21st Century

by Scott Bricker Expert Educator Columnist, USA Over the course of the past two weeks, as I enjoyed some much needed down time and even a few days away from my computer, I have been very aware of how nice it was to not feel so “connected” as when school is in session and my every minute is consumed in front of my computer, working with a student on their computer, or talking about computers with teachers and staff around campus. My personal and professional worlds are so different than ever before but it is time to get back to the new reality we face in Educational Technology. There is no doubt that technology is rapidly changing the landscape of our classrooms and the many ways in which our students learn. Given that One-to-One Programs and other similar ventures have students staring at a computer or tablet screen for as many as several hours a day, I must admit to having some pretty serious concerns about how my students will learn and communicate with each …