All posts tagged: OneDrive

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Bridget Crooks: The Student Voice- Top 5 Tech Tools for 2014

It is very easy to see the value in a tech tool as a teacher. We see the learning in our classrooms clearly. We are very aware of the learning that needs to take place and the movement we have to take to get there.

But sometimes we forget to actually ask our students what they like to use. And most importantly what adds value to their education; what’s easy and intuitive to use; what fits their learning and their lives.

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Paulina Hernandez: OneDrive Can Make Our Lives Easier!

by Paulina Hernandez Expert Educator Columnist, Mexico As teachers, there are many technologies available for us today, some very recommended. But only until you use them do you realize how useful and amazing they really are … so this time, I will talk about OneDrive, an app provided by Microsoft and one of my favorites to use with my students. First of all, I will tell you why I consider it a very useful tool and how can you use it in education. I think this has happened to most of us– when a student has to deliver some papers and once he/she arrives at school and starts looking for their USB drive, they realize it’s been forgotten it at home. That’s when they usually proceed to ask to be allowed to deliver their homework the next day. And then there are those times when you’re working on your computer and suddenly there goes an update, so the computer shuts down and you didn’t get the chance to save anything, meaning you will have to …

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Scott Wieprecht- Office 365: Blast Off

by Scott Wieprecht Expert Educator Columnist, UK So, you’ve heard about Office 365, you think your school could possibly benefit from it, but how do you know, how can you be sure, and more importantly, how do you go about finding out? The first thing is it’s free! As the pressure around schools financially increases, making the right decision about software and service purchases can seem like a burden too big to bare – that’s not the case with Office 365. You can freely sign up, have a play around, and confirm it’s right for you – although I promise it is, even in its most basic use. How do I know? Because of Outlook. It doesn’t matter how good a school network is, or how much ‘redundancy’ your school computer geeks tell you they have; at some point, sometime, your email will go down. Only when that happens do you realize quite how crucial email is to you, and how difficult things become without it.

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Koen Timmers- Beware! Courseware in the Cloud!

by Koen Timmers Expert Educator Columnist, Belgium As I teach web design, students need to have the right images and pieces of code to create a webpage. At first, I shared these files on our school’s intranet network, which of course can’t be accessed by students who weren’t able to attend my class. The implementation of cloud services seemed to overcome this problem. OneDrive (formerly known as SkyDrive) solved my problem- all students, including those who happened to be ill, were able to access the needed documents and assignments. After a while I went a step further– I began to share digital courseware on OneDrive. As a  computer science teacher, I strive to create a paperless classroom. I believe digital courseware can offer a lot of benefits and opportunities. Using digital courseware over paper takes some time to be accustomed to; ten years ago, only one student in a large group preferred a digital course. Nowadays, only one student prefers to receive a paper version.

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News Flash- Why We’re On Cloud Nine Today

“You’ve run out of storage space on this drive.” A message none of us never want to see, and one you’ll never have to see again. Today, it was announced that OneDrive is offering unlimited, yes unlimited, cloud storage for all Office 365 Subscribers at no additional cost. That’s really all there is to it, no extra conditions. The roll out will continue over the next few months so go here to sign up to be one of the first! How will this help you in the classroom? Leave your thoughts below!