All posts tagged: uk

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Andrew Howard: Changing Student Engagement in Technology

by Andrew Howard Expert Educator Columnist, UK When preparing my talk for the Microsoft Education Leaders’ Briefing at BETT, London, I was reflecting further on the issue of student engagement. As I said in my last blog, students are, in fact, resistant to adopting technological solutions and educational experiences. Yes, they will do something with glee if it is presented via technology, but only in fact because it is a gimmick and something different. When you try to instil long term change and technology adoption in a student body, you quickly come against resistance. We call our young people digital natives and ourselves the immigrants; we have done so for so long that it has become the accepted norm. And I don’t disagree with this (although there are young educators coming into schools now who also qualify as digital natives … ). What I disagree with is that this is then the end of the discussion. They are the natives, so we don’t need to guide them or teach them how to use it. Also, …

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Andrew Howard: The Problem of Being a 21st Century Principal

by Andrew Howard Expert Educator Columnist, UK When I started teaching, a quarter of a century ago, the school I started teaching in had the most modern technology out – one black & white photocopier (only used by the Senior Management) & a couple old fashioned ‘Banda’ machines (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spirit_duplicator) were the height of technology… the young people had all the problems of being young, without the overlay of technology – the biggest ‘complaint’ was that the house phone cord would not stretch enough for young people to have a private conversation with friends! To get a feel for my journey into teaching, please see my interview on Anthony Salcito’s blog, Daily Edventures; I am as passionate today (if not more so) about changing young people’s lives as I was 25 years ago!

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Scott Wieprecht: Opening an Office 365 Account? It’s Not That Hard!

by Scott Wieprecht Expert Educator Columnist, UK Opening an Office 365 account for your school may seem like a daunting task, when in reality it is a fairly straight forward procedure. There are countess guides on how to start the technical side of things out there, so I won’t be looking at this in as much detail. Instead I will be talking about the key things to set right when starting out, to make sure your installation runs smoothly into the future. Firstly, you obviously need to open your account. At this point you will be asked for two key pieces of information – the details of your admin email address, and the ‘friendly name’ you will use, which is “friendlyname”.onmicrosoft.com. In terms of the email address it is key to ensure that this is an email address that the school has access to if you were to leave, as this can become a huge problem later down the line if suddenly no one can access the admin area. Secondly, make sure you get the …

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Amanda Crabb: First Words

by Amanda Crabb Expert Educator Columnist, UK The excitement of a toddler who has just said their first words is a special and treasured moment. Parents wait in anticipation to hear their child’s first comprehensible word and the thrill of hearing their precious child take their first steps into a world where they can communicate using words and sentences is always a happy moment. Granted, whilst many parents are disappointed to discover that their child’s first utterance is the dreaded “no”, their accomplishment of such an incredible milestone is always celebrated nonetheless. Each new word added to a child’s vocabulary brings with it it’s own excitement and celebration. I find myself in a position where I am truly privileged; I get to experience children taking their first steps in communication regularly. My job is wonderful; it is exciting, enjoyable and rewarding. But it is not what you think. I do not work in a nursery or day care centre. I do not work with toddlers. In fact, I do not work with children who should …