All posts tagged: what’s fresh

shafque-spark

Shafaque Riaz: Learning Happens in Every Problem-Solving Experience

by Shafaque Riaz Expert Educator Columnist, UAE This time focus of my post is that how game design naturally supports learning. For me, learning is something that happens across every context that you’re in. Each time you’re involved in a particular form of problem solving whether it’s easy or hard, you’re engaged in some form of learning. Now a days the modern games are designed with a provision of set of experiences assuming that learners are active constructors of meaning with their own drives, goals, and motivations. A learning game play provides multiple routes of participation and meaning making. Content and resources are delivered on demand to solve problem. Inclusive game designs just don’t throw everything on you, but they let you explore at a reasonable pace and interestingly it’s mostly self-determined. You can go back and forth, practice as much as you wish. Games are very good in letting the players unfold and explore and become master at their own progress levels. A model of game design for learning suggested by Shaffer, squire, Halverson …

nam-2-3

Nam Ngo Thanh: Global Project With OneNote

by Nam Ngo Thanh Expert Educator Columnist, Vietnam My name’s Nam, I’m a teacher from Vietnam. I love project-based teaching and would love to implement this throughout my teaching job. I don’t only want to limit my project within student’s range but I also look for collaboration with teachers from other countries. What tool should I go for to benefit this cooperation? OneNote, the best tool I’ve ever used, has caused me a great interest. Why do I prefer OneNote? -No restriction of geographic distance and different schedules -Support to store, set up and share a variety of information at one source. -Easily accessible

bridget-3-featured

Bridget Crooks: Redefining My Classroom in 2015

by Bridget Crooks Expert Educator Columnist, New Zealand Redefining – to change the meaning of something or to make people think about something in a new or different way. I am sure most of us have heard of the SAMR model for the integration of technology into our classrooms. Developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura, this model (see image above) shows a progression (or ladder) that teachers often follow as they use technology in their classrooms. What I like best about SAMR is that it supports teachers to design, develop and create innovative learning opportunities in the classroom. It aims to transform learning experiences – which ultimately result in better achievement for our students. Image the creation of Dr. Ruben Puentedura, Ph.D. http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/ What excites me the most is redefinition. But remember – it doesn’t mean that you are doing it wrong if you don’t reach redefinition, some tasks just aren’t made for it and great learning can happen without redefining what you do in the classroom.

WIN12_Son_Dell_05

Andy Li: My e-School Bag– OneNote

by Andy Li Expert Educator Columnist, Hong Kong Tablet PCs have become affordable nowadays. This drives e-Learning into a BYOD era. Students are able to obtain large amount of information and absorb knowledge through the Internet with their own personal learning devices. However, a simple, multi-platform and convenient tool is needed to use with their devices for learning so that students can save, consolidate, and share their learning resources with other students and teachers. OneNote can fulfill everything we need. In Windows 8, OneNote as a Windows app has already been installed as default. Students just need to log onto Windows 8 with their Microsoft account to activate the OneNote app. OneNote can also be used on iOS and Android and students can view their notes anytime and anywhere through their smartphones or other tablets. What is OneNote?

WIN13_Nelly_HP_07

Sachita Jeeta: Believe the Impossible – My Experience as an MIE Expert 2015

by Sachita Jeeta Expert Educator Columnist, Mauritius BELIEVE IN YOUR DREAMS! Great achievement was once impossible for me, until someone set a goal to make it a reality… Friday, 7th November 2014, something unbelievable happened. It was around 19hrs when I was checking my email. As usual I started deleting unwanted emails. Soon after, I saw an email “Razan Roberts (Vega Cons….”. I ignored it and said to myself “… all these spammy emails keep coming to my inbox… I’ll delete it later”. I continued reading and deleting my emails when suddenly the one I ignored appeared onto my screen. To my surprise the word “Microsoft” caught my eyes – Then I said “This is something serious!” I took all my time to read it and kept thinking “was all this true, or am I dreaming”. I read the email again and again and followed the Survey link, joined MIE Expert 2015 Facebook group, downloaded the OneNote Playbook, registered for monthly Connection Call and started following #MIEExpert15 hashtag on Twitter.

WIN13_Sarah_Surface_09

Kelli Etheredge: Looking for a New Year’s Resolution? Resolve to Use OneNote with Your Students!

by Kelli Etheredge Expert Educator Columnist, USA Happy New Year! As it is every year, resolutions are a hot topic.  Twitter, Facebook, commercials – everywhere I look someone is resolving to change a habit.  While some center around personal goals (improving your health, de-cluttering), others are focused on work goals (learning a new skill, organizing).  I’ll admit it – I don’t think I have ever stuck to a New Year’s resolution.  Sad, I know.  Don’t get me wrong – I have changed a habit or two in my lifetime.  They just haven’t happened as a result of a New Year’s commitment.  Instead, they have spawned from some in-the-moment experience (be it January or June) that has prompted me to change. All of the resolution chatter within the last week started me thinking about habits I have changed over the years and how they happened.  Some were resolutions I made, some were prompted by others pushing me to change, and some were happenstance.  To my surprise, upon reflecting, some of the best changes have actually occurred …

kemi-jan-featured

Kemi Olurinola: How Would You Define “Limited Technology”?

By Kemi Olurinola Expert Educator Columnist, Nigeria Recently I read an article on Mind/Shift titled Think Big: How to Jumpstart Tech Use In Low-Income Schools. The title did get my attention and so I decide to read the article, I am always interested in adding to my bank of ideas aimed at helping low income schools. The article was about Daisy Dyer Duerr, Prek-12 Principal of St. Paul Public Schools in St. Paul, Arkansas. While it did make an interesting read and I would readily recommend it, my focus of interest was at the point where the technologies available at her school were listed. When Duerr started at St. Paul Schools three years ago, the technology available to teachers was limited to a: few smart boards, two computer labs with shared PC desktops and a laptop cart with 10 Mac Books still in their boxes. What is amazing about this is that, this is meant to be a public school with “limited technology”. Where I come from or live and work a school that boast …

WIN12_Moho_03

Tammy Dunbar: Let’s Resolve to Get Messy!

by Tammy Dunbar Expert Educator Columnist, USA Too often our New Year’s Resolutions involve perfection: we want to look better, weigh less, and have whiter teeth (but not whiter hair). We want our students to score higher on those standardized tests, our lesson plans to work efficiently and effectively the first time, and our technology to work exactly the way it’s supposed to every time. This New Year, let’s instead resolve to be more like my animated hero, Ms. Frizzle. Let’s take chances. Let’s make mistakes. Let’s get messy. If we want our students to become problem-solvers, we need to let them practice it without worrying about grades or assessments. We need to be comfortable with them discussing ideas and trying them out. We need to embrace this attitude, both in ourselves and in our students. Our students are terrified of being wrong; we need to guide them toward the idea that failure is valuable. Henry Ford once pointed out, “The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing.”

WIN13_Brittany_Lenovo_02

Scott Bricker: The Coach’s Corner- Communication in the 21st Century

by Scott Bricker Expert Educator Columnist, USA Over the course of the past two weeks, as I enjoyed some much needed down time and even a few days away from my computer, I have been very aware of how nice it was to not feel so “connected” as when school is in session and my every minute is consumed in front of my computer, working with a student on their computer, or talking about computers with teachers and staff around campus. My personal and professional worlds are so different than ever before but it is time to get back to the new reality we face in Educational Technology. There is no doubt that technology is rapidly changing the landscape of our classrooms and the many ways in which our students learn. Given that One-to-One Programs and other similar ventures have students staring at a computer or tablet screen for as many as several hours a day, I must admit to having some pretty serious concerns about how my students will learn and communicate with each …

WIN14_David_Acer_Asus_01

Amanda Crabb: First Words

by Amanda Crabb Expert Educator Columnist, UK The excitement of a toddler who has just said their first words is a special and treasured moment. Parents wait in anticipation to hear their child’s first comprehensible word and the thrill of hearing their precious child take their first steps into a world where they can communicate using words and sentences is always a happy moment. Granted, whilst many parents are disappointed to discover that their child’s first utterance is the dreaded “no”, their accomplishment of such an incredible milestone is always celebrated nonetheless. Each new word added to a child’s vocabulary brings with it it’s own excitement and celebration. I find myself in a position where I am truly privileged; I get to experience children taking their first steps in communication regularly. My job is wonderful; it is exciting, enjoyable and rewarding. But it is not what you think. I do not work in a nursery or day care centre. I do not work with toddlers. In fact, I do not work with children who should …